Hallux Valgus

This is the deviation of the big toe towards the outside of the foot. This is a common deformity and is often completely painless. Many patients do suffer from painful feet as a result of this deformity. Pain or aching may occur across the foot or in the toes. Callous or hardened skin may occur under the ball of the foot or along the big toe (hallux).Hallux valgus
Treatment is firstly using sensible wide fitting footwear to avoid pressure on the deformed foot. Insoles may be of benefit but usually improvement is short lived. Surgery offers a lasting solution to the problem.
Many operations can be performed for bunions and hallux valgus. An essential part of assessment of foot disorders includes a clinical examination and x-rays. These will identify exactly what is the cause of the problem and allow an accurate plan for surgical correction.

In principle, surgery involves removing the bunion and reshaping the bones to provide a straight foot. A straight big toe will allow the foot to function more normally and reduce pain. The bones are fixed using strong metal screws and plaster of paris is therefore not required. A special post-operative shoe is worn for 6 weeks after surgery during which time weight is taken through the heel to allow walking. To see the post-operative program click here 

6 weeks after hallux valgus surgery

6 weeks after hallux valgus surgery

 

6 weeks after hallux valgus surgery

6 weeks after hallux valgus surgery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some centres offer Minimally Invasive surgery or MICA (Minimally Invasive Chevron & Akin osteotomy) and advocate improved outcomes over the standard techniques. The current situation is summed up in the following statement from the Journal of Trauma & Orthopaedics which states “There have been articles promoting MICA in the national press, generating public interest with claims of good long-term results, reduced swelling and pain and earlier return to function. This may be headline grabbing and attractive to patients, but medicine must remain evidence based. These publicised results and early post- operative benefits have not been substantiated with robust clinical evidence. Importantly, the good published results for HV correction with open chevron osteotomy should not be transferred to the MICA technique because the surgery is very different.”

Currently Mr Uglow does not use a MICA technique for hallux valgus⊕ but maintains the high standards offered by standard open surgery.

⊕ [Mr Uglow does promote percutaneous techniques where they are deemed to be suitable and better than standard open techniques.]